HUI216.01 -- ITALIAN CIVILIZATION (Winter session 2007)

General information and announcements

Calendar: lectures, office hours, exams and deadlines

Lectures and assignments, readings

Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4 | Day 5 | Day 6

Day 7 | Day 8 | Day 9 | Day 10 | Day 11 | Day 12

Review sheets

Syllabus

Topics for the paper

General bibliography

Site map of campo7


General information and announcements

Make sure to read the latest announcements regarding this class and its web pages. Announcements are labeled according to their contents:
- "[Schedule]" indicates important changes that affect the schedule of lectures and office hours (cancellations due to inclement weather, temporary changes of classroom, deadline reminders);
- "[Content]" signals new uploads, new pages, or additions and deletions to the list of readings and assignments;
- "[Technical]" refers to events that affect the functionality and availability of these pages;
- "[Other]" includes useful information about grants and awards for undergraduates, on-campus lectures and debates, etc.
Remember that, depending on the configuration of your browser, you may have to hit "Refresh" or "Reload" on your next visit in order to update the contents of this page.

This page was last updated on Jan. 27, 2007, at 2:35 PM.

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Jan. 18 [Content] -- Under Day 11, I have added audio files with relevant sections of the last lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 18 [Content] -- I have updated the Review sheets to cover all topics and readings, including those from Day 11.

Jan. 17 [Content] -- Under Day 10, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 17 [Content] -- Under Days 10 and 11 I have added today's and tomorrow's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats, including the new, black and white Powerpoint version. I have added all the remaining required readings.

Jan. 16 [Content] -- Under Day 9, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 16 [Content] -- You can click on these links to see the questions that were included in past exams, when the class was offered with a different format, during regular semesters (all the files are in Acrobat format, and the correct answers for the multiple-choice questions are format in bold): Midterm 1, Midterm 2, Final exam.

Jan. 16 [Content] -- Under Day 8, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics. Under Day 9 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats, including a new, black and white PowerPoint version.

Jan. 12 [Content] -- Under Day 8 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats.

Jan. 12 [Content] -- Under Day 7, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics. Under Day 8 I have added a required reading. I have marked with a strikeout line those topics that will not be covered in this Winter session.

Jan. 11 [Content] -- Under Day 7 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats, including the new, black and white Acrobat version. I have also added suggested and required readings. I have updated the Review sheets. Under Day 6, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 10 [Content] -- Under Day 6 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats, including a new, black and white Acrobat version. I have also added suggested and required readings. I have updated the Review sheets. Under Day 5, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 9 [Content] -- Under Day 5 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats. I have also added suggested and required readings. I have updated the Review sheets. Under Day 4, I have added audio files with relevant sections of that lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 5 [Content] -- Under Day 4 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats. I have also added suggested and required readings.

Jan. 4 [Content] -- Under Day 3, I have added audio files with relevant sections of the lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 4 [Content] -- Under Day 3 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats. I have also added suggested readings on the Etruscans, that can be used for paper [2]. Under Days 1 and 2 I have fixed minor mistakes or imperfections inside the presentations. I have updated the Review sheets, noting the relevance of all topics and readings from the lectures of Days 1-3.

Jan. 3 [Content] -- Under Day 2, I have added audio files with relevant sections of yesterday's lecture, subdivided by topics.

Jan. 3 [Content] -- Under Day 1 I have fixed the formatting inside the txt version of that lecture's presentation. Under Day 2 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats. I have posted the required reading of Day 2. Under Day 1, I have added audio files with relevant sections of my lecture.

Jan. 2 [Content] -- Under Day 1 I have added today's Powerpoint presentation, in various formats.

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


Calendar: class schedule, office hours, deadlines

Always check this site and the USB homepage for last-minute announcements about cancellations due to the weather or an emergency. The University Emergency Operations Center (EOC) allows you to monitor the latest forecasts, provides detailed notifications and updated information. As an alternative, you can rely on WUSB 90.1 FM Radio, Campus Cable Channel 8, News 12 and other local media stations.

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[Day 12] Jan. 19, Friday
1:30-2:45, review session (Humanities 1057).
2:55-4:55, final exam (Humanities 1057).

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


Lectures and assignments, required and optional readings

This list may be subject to minor changes and adjustments during the semester.
Required readings, together with class lectures and presentations, include all the topics covered in the exams.
Suggested readings may be used to research the topics and subtopics of the paper or to pursue personal interests.
Lecture notes in HTML can be viewed online with most Internet browsers: the framed HTML version works best in Internet Explorer, and will work as well in Netscape, provided that you set the page to "Display like Internet Explorer" (use the button in the bottom left corner). Firefox seems to require more tweaking, and if you know of a good, effective trick, please let me know.
If you would rather see/print the notes in PowerPoint (.ppt), and you don't have a copy of that software, you can click here to download Microsoft's free PowerPoint viewer for Windows. Click here for the Macintosh edition of the PowerPoint viewer.
For the Acrobat (.pdf) version, you can download the latest version of the free Acrobat Reader, for Windows, MAC or Unix/Linux, from Adobe.
Text (.txt) and Rich Text Format files (.rtf) can be opened and edited with almost all word processors.
Audio files in mp3 can be played on different platforms and different media. If you need assistance identifying the software you need, please contact me.

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Day 1 (Jan. 2)

Topics
0.1 A general overview of the class; the web site; the syllabus.
0.2 The paper: recommendations and ideas, format, topics, drafts. Plagiarism, with examples.
0.3 The final exam. Preparing for the exam.
1.1 Different Italians. The South and the North of Italy.
1.2 The slow process of political unification.
1.3 Dual identities throughout Italian history. Unifying factors in Italian civilization.
1.4 "La parola Italia" [The word Italy].
1.5 Obstacles along the path to Italy's cultural and political unification: geography and history.
1.6 Italian proverbs and the strength of local cultures/identities.
1.7 The Italian national anthem. Giorgio Gaber's song "I don't feel Italian" (2003).
1.8 The Italian flag. The emblem of the Italian Republic.
1.9 National Italian identity and the issue of language. Standard Italian: its components. Standard Italian and literature. Tuscan, Florentine and Italian literature, culture and society. Literary Tuscan and Italian culture/society.
1.10 Neolatin vernaculars in Italy. Examples of present-day Italian dialects.
1.11 Body language in Italian society. Excerpts from "Gesture in Italian Speech," by Laura Raffa. Italian gestures.
1.12 Bilingualism and diglossia in Italy. Bilingualism in the emigrant Italian communities.
1.13 Foreign languages spoken in Italy.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 1 in .html, Web version: Tuesday, Jan. 2.
- day 1 in Acrobat (.pdf): Tuesday, Jan. 2.
- day 1 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Tuesday, Jan. 2 (size: 3.2 MB).
- day 1 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Tuesday, Jan. 2.
- day 1 in plain text (.txt): Tuesday, Jan. 2.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topics 1.1-1.3, slides 13-28 (45', size: 10.2 MB).
- Topics 1.3-1.5, slides 29-36 (32', size: 7.4 MB).

Suggested readings
- You can listen to 2 clips from the song "Io non mi sento italiano", by Giorgio Gaber (2003): "I, G. G., was born and live in Milan..." (.mp3, 33", stereo); "I am sorry Mr. President..." (.mp3, 23", stereo).
- Listen to the Italian national anthem (scroll the page up a few lines, and then click on the link inside the gray box, above the lyrics, where you see the words "ascolta l'inno").
- From The New York Times (March 31, 2002): "In Italy, a Busy Crossroads of History" By Frederika Randall (free registration required; otherwise, click here to see the article in Acrobat format, no editing or printing allowed). This is a very simple piece from the travel section of the New York Times, highlighting the beauty of the region of Apulia and reminding the reader, through short statements by local Italians and simple historical references, how complex and rich the history of a small Italian region can be.
- if you want to see political and historical maps of Italy, you can visit this site http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/italy.html, or click here for an interactive map, where you can zoom from the entire peninsula to the map of a single city, with its main streets and the various neighborhood.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, ed. By George Holmes, read the Editor's Foreword (pp. v-vii).

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Day 2 (Jan. 3)

Topics
2.1 Statistics and data about modern Italy.
2.2 OECD: demographics, population (1989-2004). Demographics, by age (1960-1999). Ageing societies (2005, 2020). Foreign population (1989-2002). Population growth rate (1993-2003). Public support per child in the EU.
2.3 Gross Domestic Product (2002). Average economic growth of real GDP (1991-2005).
2.4 Unemployment rates (1991-2003). Part-time employment (1991-2003).
2.5 Government deficits (1991-2003).
2.6 Expenditure on R&D (1995-2000).
2.7 The Italian census of 2001: demographics, families. Foreign-born residents. Geographic distribution. Distribution by municipality. Internal migration.
2.8 Chronology of Italian civilization. The Roman/Latin Era (753 BCE-476 CE).
2.9 The Middle Ages (476-1375). The preservation of medieval culture and the revival of medieval traditions in Tuscany. Neo-guelphism. Maurice Hewlett and the Anglo-American travelers from the early 1900s.
2.10 Humanism (1375-1475): culture and the arts. Socio-political trends.
2.11 Renaissance (1476-1550): political events.
2.12 Modernity (1551-1861): culture and politics.
2.13 The last 150 years: unification; the monarchy; the two World Wars; fascism; the Republic.
2.14 Federalism: the Northern League. The reform of the Constitution: the federal Senate. The Assembly of the Republic.
2.15 Italy and Europe. The foundation of the European Union. 1973-1995: the European Union grows. 2003-2006: the EU 27. The European Union and the euro.
2.16 The main institutions of the EU.
2.17 What kind of federation will the European Union become? Italy's positions. The issue of language.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 2 in .html, Web version: Wednesday, Jan. 3.
- day 2 in Acrobat (.pdf): Wednesday, Jan. 3.
- day 2 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Wednesday, Jan. 3 (size: 4.2 MB).
- day 2 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Wednesday, Jan. 3.
- day 2 in plain text (.txt): Wednesday, Jan. 3.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topic 1.5, slides 36-39 (29', size: 6.5 MB).
- Topics 1.6-1.8, slides 40-55 (26', size: 5.9 MB).
- Topics 1.9-1.13, slides 56-71 (24', size: 5.5 MB).
- Topics 2.1-2.6, slides 3-18 (41', size: 9.3 MB).
- Topic 2.7, slides 19-24 (15', size: 3.5 MB).
- Topic 2.8, slides 25-29 (13', size: 3.1 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are numerous links inside today's presentation.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- Andrea Fedi, "Maurice Hewlett and Tuscany's hidden treasures".

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Day 3 (Jan. 4)

Topics
3.1 Italy 1000 BCE -- 400 BCE. The Etruscans: geography and basic historical facts. The Etruscans and the Romans.
3.2 Excerpts from The Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria by George Dennis (London, 1848).
3.3 Some texts on Etruscan civilization and today's Tuscany.
3.4 The Indo-Europeans arrive in Italy. Indo-European languages: the latest theories.
3.5 Early Italy: the Greeks.
3.6 Contributions by the Greeks to Roman civilization. Foundational myths of the Romans: Romulus and Remus, Aeneas.
3.7 The Griko dialect and the Italian Greeks.
3.8 The Carthaginians.
3.9 Early Italy: other cultures and peoples.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 3 in .html, Web version: Thursday, Jan. 4.
- day 3 in Acrobat (.pdf): Thursday, Jan. 4.
- day 3 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Thursday, Jan. 4 (size: 4 MB).
- day 3 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Thursday, Jan. 4.
- day 3 in plain text (.txt): Thursday, Jan. 4.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Recap and topic 2.9, slides 30-34 (54', size: 12.2 MB).
- Topic 2.9, slides 35-37 (18', size: 4.1 MB).
- Topics 2.10-2.17, slides 38-65 (44', size: 10 MB).
- Topics 3.1-3.4, slides 2-24 (40', size: 9.1 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are numerous links inside today's presentation.
- The Etruscan World: a very well-organized and informative virtual exhibition, from the University of Pennsylvania Museum.
- The Etruscans: basic Web site of the Mugello Valley archeological project (very interesting, plenty of pictures).
- Read the Introduction to an 1848 book on the Etruscans, written by George Dennis (it's in two parts, whose links are posted here): Introduction, Part I; Introduction, Part II.
- Or, instead of the introduction, you can read the following chapter from that book, Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria (even this is in two parts, linked here): Chap. XVIII, Part I; Chap. XVIII, Part II.
Keep in mind that our goal, when reading from George Dennis, is not primarily to learn about the Etruscans, but to get a better understanding of the representation and the appreciation of Pre-Roman civilizations in modern Western culture.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 1-15.

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Day 4 (Jan. 5)

Topics
4.1 More on the foundational myths of the Romans.
4.2 Characteristics of the ancient Romans.
4.3 What remains of Roman civilization.
4.4 Pompeii.
4.5 Roman law. The idea of a secular state. Written laws, precedents, the discretion of judges. Judges and jurists. Law and society. Public and private law. Justinian.
4.6 The Calendar.
4.7 The American Founding Fathers and Rome. The US as the new Rome. Palladio. Jefferson in France. The US Capitol. George Washington as Cincinnatus.
4.8 Neoclassical architecture in the US.
4.9 Neoclassical architecture in the US: bibliographical sources.
4.10 "There's Nothing Conservative About the Classics' Revival," by Garry Wills (NYT, 1997). Women studies. Multiculturalizing the canon. Subversive classics. Intentional omissions and the notion of a "classical age." Multiculturalism in the Aeneid. Black Athena. The study of Latin. Classics in translation.
4.11 The classics in the Italian curriculum.
4.12 Classical architecture in Italy: barbarians and Barberinis. The vanishing of bronze statues. Marcus Aurelius.
4.13 Master Gregory visits Rome.
4.14 Ancient Rome: the monarchy. Gary Forsythe on the seven kings of Rome. Livy's History of Rome: Book 1, Preface.
4.15 Ancient Rome: the Republic. Livy's History of Rome (Bk. 1, Preface): national character, military expansion.
4.16 Social classes in Roman society. Patricians and Plebeians.
4.17 Foreigners and slaves in ancient Rome. Slaves in Roman society: familia urbana. "The Cultural Significance of Roman Manumission." Slaves in the fields: familia rustica. William Fitzgerald, Slavery and the Roman Literary Imagination (2000).
4.18 Meals of the Romans (from C.A.E. Luschnig, "Potes esurire mecum"). Wine, conviviality. The Roman dining room. The table napkins of the clients. Sauces made with fish or wine. Apicius's recipe book.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 4 in .html, Web version: Friday, Jan. 5.
- day 4 in Acrobat (.pdf): Friday, Jan. 5.
- day 4 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Friday, Jan. 5 (size: 3.9 MB).
- day 4 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Friday, Jan. 5.
- day 4 in plain text (.txt): Friday, Jan. 5.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps):
- Introduction and topics 3.5-3.6, slides 25-30 (40', size: 9.2 MB).
- Topics 3.6-3.9, slides 31-37 (10', size: 2.2 MB).
- Topics 4.1-4.6, slides 2-10 (32', size: 7.2 MB).
- Topics 4.7-4.13, slides 11-49 (27', size: 6.2 MB).
- Topics 4.14-4.18, slides 50-75 (33', size: 7.5 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are numerous links inside today's presentation.
- A short, simple piece on the Roman calendar: http://www.crowl.org/Lawrence/time/months.html.
- A more elaborate site on the Roman calendar, with interesting images: http://webexhibits.org/calendars/calendar-roman.html.
- Roman art and architecture from various periods: lots of images and short commentaries: http://harpy.uccs.edu/images/roman/html/roman.html.
- A virtual exhibition on The Roman world, from the University of Pennsylvania Museum.
- To supplement your knowledge of practical aspects of Roman life, let me recommend to you this good virtual tour of a Roman "Villa rustica" located in Southern Germany (in English, quick and informative): http://www.villa-rustica.de/tour/toure.html.
- A 2003 article from the New York Times, presenting recent discoveries about the Etruscans and their civilization
- "The Young American Nation and the Classical World": an article in Acrobat format (1.9 MB), by Edwin A. Miles (Journal of the History of Ideas 35.2 [Apr.-Jun. 1974], 259-74).
- The Laws of the XII tables (in English, with notes and commentary): http://www.constitution.org/sps/sps01_1.htm.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- excerpts from the Roman historian Livy, recounting the foundational myths of the Romans.

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Day 5 (Jan. 9)

Topics
5.1 Rome vs. Carthage (270 BCE). The 3 Punic wars. Roman historian Livy on the 2nd Punic war (bk. 21).
5.2 Hannibal in popular culture. Contemporary Italian songs on Hannibal.
5.3 The last 100 years of the Roman Republic. The Roman Empire. Time, history, life. Simple progress vs. constant progress. The cyclical movement of time. Cyclical time in Machiavelli's political theories.
5.4 The historical novel Pompeii (2003), by Robert Harris. The main characters in the novel. The plot and the organization of the events. Historical elements and the themes associated with them.
5.5 James Hay, Popular Film Culture in Fascist Italy (1987). Popularity of Roman civilization in Fascist Italy.
5.6 Scipione l'africano (dir. Carmine Gallone, 1937). Fascism and the ancient Romans. Scipio and Mussolini. Mussolini and the Greco-Roman heroes.
5.7 The plot of the movie Scipione l'Africano.
5.8 Italy past and present in the movie Scipione l'Africano.
5.9 Movie projects on Hannibal.
5.10 Spartacus and the 1951 novel by Howard Fast.
5.11 The plot of the movie Spartacus.
5.12 Hollywood and ancient Rome: Spartacus and Italian geography. Spartacus and the Roman empire. Romans in Spartacus. The Roman senators in Spartacus. Sex and decadence in Spartacus. The disconnect between Roman civilization and Italian history. Ethnicity in Spartacus.
5.13 The plot of the movie Gladiator.
5.14 Gladiator and the greatness of Rome. Gladiator and Italy. Gladiator and the themes of ambition, progress.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 5 in .html, Web version: Tuesday, Jan. 9.
- day 5 in Acrobat (.pdf): Tuesday, Jan. 9.
- day 5 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Tuesday, Jan. 9 (size: 4.9 MB).
- day 5 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Tuesday, Jan. 9.
- day 5 in plain text (.txt): Tuesday, Jan. 9.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topics 5.1-5.2, slides 1-9 (35', size: 8.1 MB).
- Topics 5.2-5.3, slides 10-18 (35', size: 8.1 MB).
- Topic 5.3, slides 18-25 (37', size: 8.4 MB).
- Topic 5.4, slides 26-41 (25', size: 5.8 MB).
- Topic 5.5, slides 42-46 (12', size: 2.8 MB).
- Topics 5.6-5.14, slides 47-92 (7', size: 1.6 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are numerous links inside today's presentation.
- This is a collection of sites about Hannibal, the great Carthaginian general who defeated the Romans on their own Italian grounds:
- A site on Hannibal, with useful information about his Roman counterpart, general Scipio Africanus: http://www.livius.org/ha-hd/hannibal/hannibal.html (plenty of interesting links, images and documents, all in English).
- Machiavelli mentioned Hannibal and Scipio in a key passage of the Prince: http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm (in English).
- A short excerpt on the assassination of Julius Caesar, from the biography written by Greek historian Plutarch: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/plutarch-caesar.html (in English).
- A page with links to each of the scenes of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/julius_caesar/index.html
- Reviews of the movie Spartacus can be found at http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/Spartacus-1019544/
- If you have chosen to write a paper on the topic of Italian Fascism and ancient Rome [Topic no. 6], remember that your paper must focus on references to ancient Rome in Fascist propaganda and in Fascist culture. If you visit the following link, inside the Stony Brook library page, http://sunysb.edu/~library/eresources/databases/j.html, you will find, inside the database called JSTOR, plenty of articles on this topic. In particular, I recommend that you read this one: "Fascist Doctrine and the Cult of the RomanitÓ" by Romke Visser, Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Jan., 1992), pp. 5-22.
- In the Stony Brook library page, at http://sunysb.edu/~library/eresources/databases/j.html, you can click on the link for the database called JSTOR, to find this article (which you can read on screen, download as an Acrobat file, or print): "Cinema and the Fall of Rome" by Martin M. Winkler, Transactions of the American Philological Association (1974-), Volume 125 (1995), 135-154.
- One of the best sites available on the Roman gladiators, with relevant remarks on the movie Gladiator: http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/consortium/gladiators.html.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- excerpts from James Hay, Popular Film Culture in Fascist Italy (password required).

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Day 6 (Jan. 10)

Topics
6.1 Summary of the excerpts from The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire, by Edward N. Luttwak, 1976.
6.2 Excerpts from The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire. The fundamentals. Superiority of the Romans? Weaponry and leadership. Political goals and the military. Political use of military power. Conserve force, advance slowly. Avoid losses whenever possible. A complex security system, hard to bring down. Deterrence.
6.3 Systems of imperial security. Goals and results of the 3 systems.
6.4 About the Roman infantry. Discipline and propaganda in the Roman army. The organization of the Roman army. Josephus describes the Roman army: the chain of command, the ranks.
6.5 Tacitus and the idea of a decadent Roman empire.
6.6 Publius Cornelius Tacitus: his life and career.
6.7 The rediscovery of Tacitus by humanists.
6.8 Tacitus and Tacitism during the late Renaissance.
6.9 Classical historiography. Decadence in the history books of the Romans. Roman historiography and the Senate. Roman historiography and the Emperors.
6.10 The mutiny of the legions: Percennius. Tacitus' agenda. The premise. The instigator. The reaction of the soldiers. The reaction of the commanding officer. The aftermath of the first mutiny. Mutiny spreads to strategic areas of the Empire. The inadequate reaction of the Emperor; a worrysome pattern at the court. The simple strategy of Drusus, the simple minds of the soldiers. Tiberius' letter: political maneuvering, the blame game and other tricks of absolute rulers. The primitive minds of the soldiers, the casual tactics of Drusus. The superstition of the soldiers, judged by the Stoic thinker Tacitus. The massacre that ended the second mutiny, in Germany. Final considerations.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 6 in .html, Web version: Wednesday, Jan. 10.
- day 6 in Acrobat (.pdf): Wednesday, Jan. 10, or Wednesday, Jan. 10 (black and white version, without the fancy background).
- day 6 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Wednesday, Jan. 10.
- day 6 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Wednesday, Jan. 10.
- day 6 in plain text (.txt): Wednesday, Jan. 10.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Introduction (5', size: 1.3 MB).
- Comments on the scenes from the movie Scipione l'Africano (1937) (56', size: 13 MB).
- Comments on the conclusion of the movie Scipione l'Africano (2', size: 0.5 MB).
- Comments on the scenes from the movie Spartacus (25', size: 5.8 MB).
- Comments on the scenes from the movie Gladiator (10', size: 2.4 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).
- A simple page on the life of Roman soldiers from the Web site of PBS: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/warriorchallenge/romans/profile.html.
- An interview with military strategist Edward Luttwak, on general topics, and with biographical notes linking him to Italy: he's quite a character. The interview appeared on the Financial times in 1999: http://kansalaistalo.jns.fi/tietoyhteiskunta/luttwak.htm.
- From the site of PBS, a simple page on the fortress of Masada, and its conquest by the Romans.
- If you visit the following link, inside the Stony Brook library page, http://sunysb.edu/~library/eresources/databases/j.html, you can click on the link for the database called JSTOR, to find these interesting articles on Tacitus and on Rome, during this period:
- Williams, Mary Frances, "Four Mutinies: Tacitus 'Annals' 1.16-30; 1.31-49 and Ammianus Marcellinus 'Res Gestae' 20.4.9-20.5.7; 24.3.1-8," Phoenix, 51.1 (Spring 1997): 44-74.
- Laupot, Eric, "Tacitus' Fragment 2: The Anti-Roman Movement of the 'Christiani' and the Nazoreans," Vigiliae Christianae, 54.3 (2000): 233-47.
- Heller, Wendy, "Tacitus Incognito: Opera as History in 'L'incoronazione di Poppea'," Journal of the American Musicological Society, 52.1, (Spring 1999), 39-96.
- Patterson, John R., "The City of Rome: From Republic to Empire," The Journal of Roman Studies 82 (1992): 186-215.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- Tacitus describes a mutiny of the Roman legions (from the Annals, Book I);
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 19-26.

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Day 7 (Jan. 11)

Topics
7.1 The life of Nero: chronology of the main events.
7.2 How Nero becomes Emperor at the age of 17.
7.3 The murder of Agrippina. Elements of a literary tragedy inside the narration of the murder of Agrippina. Tacitus: the sin of incest, the art of innuendo. Incest, superstition, verisimile. Agrippina's theatrical death: a tragic fate. After the crime: guilt, panic, hypocrisy, escape. The responsibility and incompetence of the Senate: the opposition has high moral values, lacks a plan. The consequences of sinful behavior.
7.4 Recent attempts to explain the fall of the Roman empire. The beginning of the end: Commodus. Septimus Severus (193-211 CE). Trade deficit, the mines, hyperinflation. Diocletian (284-305 CE): his temporary solutions. His political reforms. Living conditions in the rural areas. Reduced mobility, the Empire divided. Constantine (305-337 CE). Constantine's donation. Hagia Sophia (Holy Wisdom). The end.
7.5 The fall of the empire in Valerio Massimo Manfredi, The Last Legion (2002).
7.6 Europe and the Mediterranean after the fall of the Roman empire (circa 500 CE).
7.7 Final remarks on the fall of the Roman Empire. Aldo Schiavone, The End of the Past: Ancient Rome and the Modern West (Harvard UP, 2000).
7.8 More suggested readings.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 7 in .html, Web version: Thursday, Jan. 11.
- day 7 in Acrobat (.pdf): Thursday, Jan. 11, or Thursday, Jan. 11 (black and white version).
- day 7 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Thursday, Jan. 11 (size: 1.9 MB).
- day 7 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Thursday, Jan. 11.
- day 7 in plain text (.txt): Thursday, Jan. 11.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topics 6.1-6.2, slides 2-16 (41', size: 9.5 MB).
- Topics 6.3-6.4, slides 17-23 (20', size: 4.6 MB).
- Topics 6.5-6.8, slides 25-32 (19', size: 4.4 MB).
- Topics 6.9-6.10, slides 33-60 (59', size: 13.6 MB).
- Topics 7.1-7.3, slides 2-11 (16', size: 3.6 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are many links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).
- You can read a very good Chapter entitled "Cosmopolis: Rome as World City", written by Catharine Edwards and Greg Woolf (from a volume edited by them, entitled Rome the Cosmopolis, Cambridge UP, 2003). It is in Acrobat format.

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- Tacitus about Nero and Agrippina, the great fire of Rome and the Christians (from the Annals, Books XII, XIV and XV);
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 27-38.

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Day 8 (Jan. 12)

Topics
Valerio Massimo Manfredi, The Last Legion (2002): the plot, the characters, the themes. Key ideas behind the book.
Edward Gibbon (1737-1794) and The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-1788). Gibbon's 'temporary' conversion to Catholicism. His 1764 visit to Rome and his decision to write about Rome. The goals of his work on Rome, and its success. Key ideas.

8.1 The life and death of Roman poet Lucretius.
8.2 Lucretius: On the Nature of Things. Atomism and materialism. Lucretius and Epicurus.
8.3 Religion as a social practice in ancient Rome. The religion of ancient Romans: sacrificial offerings. Superstition. Ethics, religion and politics.
8.4 Seneca and the practice of self-examination.
8.5 Cato the Elder, The Harvest Ritual (circa 160 BCE). The prayer of Scipio Africanus (from Livy, History of Rome). Actual inscriptions from Roman temples. Certificate of sacrifice to the traditional pagan gods (250 CE).
8.6 The ancient Romans, polytheism, and the gods of other religions. St. Paul in Athens. The deification of Roman emperors. The early Christians and the meat of the Pagans.
8.7 The Roman way of life: ancient Romans and other cultures.
8.8 The ancient Romans, the Jews, and the Christians. Messianism and politics. Tacitus on the Christians in Rome.
8.9 Pliny's letter to the Emperor Trajan.
8.10 Alexamenos and his god.
8.11 Excerpts from "Cocullo Snake charmers, A pagan and Christian tradition" by Elena Foresti. St. Anthony's feast in Capena.
8.12 Excerpts from Michael Carroll, Madonnas that Maim. Popular Catholicism in Italy, Chapter 4, "The Dark Side of Holiness".

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 8 in .html, Web version: Friday, Jan. 12.
- day 8 in Acrobat (.pdf): Friday, Jan. 12, or Friday, Jan. 12 (black and white version).
- day 8 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Friday, Jan. 12 (size: 2.2 MB).
- day 8 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Friday, Jan. 12.
- day 8 in plain text (.txt): Friday, Jan. 12.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topic 7.4, slides 12-17 (39', size: 9 MB).
- Topics 7.4-7.8, slides 19-35 (27', size: 6.2 MB).
- Topics 8.1-8.5, slides 2-15 (44', size: 10.1 MB).
- Topics 8.5-8.12, slides 16-44 (32', size: 7.4 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are many links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- Edward Gibbon, General Observations on the Fall of the Roman Empire in the West (from The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire [1782], Vol. 3, Chapt. 38);
- St. Augustine, excerpts from The City of God: on the virtues of the ancient Romans, on God and the Roman empire;
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 38-58.

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Day 9 (Jan. 16)

Topics
9.1 St. Augustine (354-430). The Manicheans. St. Ambrose and the allegorical interpretation of the Bible, of faith and life. St. Augustine's conversion. The frescoes of Benozzo Gozzoli in San Gimignano.
9.2 St. Augustine on grace and salvation, on the sack of Rome, on God and the Roman Empire. How St. Augustine read the classics. Why he valued the classics.
9.3 St. Augustine: metaphors that he popularized and that are still popular among Christians.
9.4 The 4 Latin doctors of the Church, in a medieval manuscript: Augustine, Ambrose, Jerome, Gregory.
9.5 The Temporal Reward Which God Granted To The Romans (from St. Augustine's The city of God, 5.15). Examples of the extraordinary virtues of the ancient Romans: Mucius. Ferdinand Bol, Titus Manlius Torquatus Beheading His Son (1661-63). Rubens, Mucius Scaevola and Porsenna (1620). Giambattista Tiepolo, Mucius Scaevola (1750-53). The virtues of the Romans, from The city of God.
9.6 Christianity and Roman civilization. St. Augustine and medieval culture.
9.7 Conclusions.
9.8 The Early Middle Ages: summary of the topics.
9.9 The Middle Ages: the definition. Localization and fragmentation. Society and culture. The dark age? The originality of medieval culture.
9.10 The Eastern Roman Empire expands its influence (6th century). Charlemagne (742-814), king of the Franks. The Papacy and the Empire.
9.11 Chivalric literature. The pupi siciliani. The great modern pupari.
9.12 Italo Calvino, The castle of crossed destinies (1969).
9.13 Feudalism. The pyramid of power inside Feudalism. The castles. Lord and vassal: mutual rights and obligations.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 9 in .html, Web version: Tuesday, Jan. 16.
- day 9 in Acrobat (.pdf): Tuesday, Jan. 16, or Tuesday, Jan. 16 (black and white version).
- day 9 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Tuesday, Jan. 16 (size: 16.9 MB!), or Tuesday, Jan. 16 (black and white version; size: 14.1 MB!).
- day 9 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Tuesday, Jan. 16.
- day 9 in plain text (.txt): Tuesday, Jan. 16.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Recap and Introduction (15', size: 3.5 MB).
- Topic 9.1, slides 2-9 (35', size: 8 MB).
- Topics 9.2-9.4, slides 10-17 (21', size: 4.8 MB).
- Topics 9.5-9.7, slides 18-29 (16', size: 3.6 MB).
- Topics 9.8-9.13, slides 30-53 (34', size: 7.8 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are many links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 58-68.

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Day 10 (Jan. 17)

Topics
10.1 St. Francis of Assisi (c. 1182-1226): his life.
10.2 Giotto and St. Francis of Assisi.
10.3 St. Francis of Assisi, The Canticle of the Sun.
10.4 The Canticle of the Sun: religious sources.
10.5 St. Francis and Christian religion. On perfect gladness (from the Little Flowers of St. Francis).
10.6 The theory of the four elements. The theory of the natural place. A model of the universe. Aristotle's first mover.
10.7 Aristotle in Western culture. Galileo Galilei and the followers of Aristotle.
10.8 The theory of the four elements in Hildegard of Bingen.
10.9 A modern opera on St. Francis of Assisi: excerpts from "The Vision of a Mystic" By Anthony Tommasini, NYT, Sept. 30, 2002.
10.10 The medieval City-state.
10.11 Dante Alighieri (1265-1321).
10.12 Dante Alighieri: his works.
10.13 The structure of Dante's Inferno (Hell). The world in the Middle Ages.
10.14 Inferno, Canto 4.
10.15 Excerpts from Italian studies in North America. Ed. by Massimo Ciavolella and Amilcare A. Iannucci. Ottawa: Dovehouse Editions, 1994.
10.16 Dante and the Italian language.
10.17 Inferno, Canto 5: references to classical civilization. The characters, the sources. The historical evidence. The literary sources (Dante, Boccaccio).
10.18 Inferno, Canto 5: pity and attraction in Dante. Francesca speaks to Dante using the language of courtesy. Dante's reaction. The opposition between sinful literature and the new enlightening literature of the Comedy.
10.19 The Dante Club: "All Literary Allusions Abandon, Ye Who Enter Here," By Janet Maslin, NYT Feb. 7, 2003.
10.20 Roberto Benigni and Dante.

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 10 in .html, Web version: Wednesday, Jan. 17.
- day 10 in Acrobat (.pdf): Wednesday, Jan. 17, or Wednesday, Jan. 17 (black and white version).
- day 10 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Wednesday, Jan. 17 (size: 14 MB!), or Wednesday, Jan. 17 (black and white version; size: 13.2 MB!).
- day 10 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Wednesday, Jan. 17.
- day 10 in plain text (.txt): Wednesday, Jan. 17.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topics 10.1-10.2, slides 2-10 (41', size: 9.3 MB).
- Topics 10.2-10.5, slides 11-23 (32', size: 7.2 MB).
- Topics 10.6-10.9, slides 24-40 (21', size: 4.8 MB).
- Topics 10.10-10.13, slides 41-51 (35', size: 8.1 MB).
- Topics 10.14-10.20, slides 52-86 (23', size: 5.3 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are many links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- St. Francis of Assisi, The Canticle of the Sun;
- Introduction to Dante's Inferno: http://www.italianstudies.org/comedy/Inferno_int.htm;
- Paolo and Francesca (Canto 5): http://www.italianstudies.org/comedy/Inferno5.htm (focus on the episode of the two lovers, vv. 70-142).

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Day 11 (Jan. 18)

Topics
11.1 Giovanni Boccaccio's life.
11.2 The Decameron (1348-51). The structure of the Decameron.
11.3 Multiple points of view in Ciappelletto's novella (Dec. 1.1). Analysis of the novella.
11.4 Pierpaolo Pasolini's movie Decameron (1971).
11.5 Boccaccio's novella and its protagonist, Ciappelletto. Final remarks.
11.6 Humanism.
11.7 Italy during the Renaissance.
11.8 The life of Leonardo.
11.9 Leonardo da Vinci: the myth. Vasari's vested interest, Burckhardt's Romantic ideal. Leonardo's defects and failures. His portrait.
11.10 Vasari's portrayal of the artist as an intellectual genius. The Renaissance artist as a thinker and a great man, the equal of Dukes and Kings. Leonardo's death in Vasari (1568 version, normalized to fit into the culture of the Counter-Reform).
11.11 The Virgin and St. Ann, by Leonardo.
11.12 Leonardo's inventions. Excerpts from an interview with Paolo Galluzzi, curator of the exhibition "Innovative Engineers of Renaissance" (2001). Leonardo's inventions in the context of late-Medieval and Renaissance technology.
11.13 Final remarks on Leonardo and Vasari.
11.14 The life of Machiavelli (1469-1527). His works.
11.15 His letter to Francesco Vettori, Dec. 10, 1513.
11.16 The Prince, dedication.
11.17 Traditional historiography and Renaissance culture.
11.18 Machiavelli's experience.
11.19 Human nature.
11.20 The Prince, Chap. 7, New principalities acquired with help of others.
References to Leonardo and to Italian civilization in Dan Brown's The DaVinci Code (2003).

Download or see online the lecture notes for this week, in any one of these formats:
- day 11 in .html, Web version: Thursday, Jan. 18.
- day 11 in Acrobat (.pdf): Thursday, Jan. 18, or Thursday, Jan. 18 (black and white version).
- day 11 in PowerPoint (.ppt): Thursday, Jan. 18 (size: 5 MB), or Thursday, Jan. 18 (black and white version; size: 3.7 MB)).
- day 11 in Rich Text Format (.rtf): Thursday, Jan. 18.
- day 11 in plain text (.txt): Thursday, Jan. 18.

Download or listen online to relevant segments of this lecture:
Mp3 format (mono, 32 Kbps)
- Topics 11.1-11.2, slides 2-8 (40', size: 9.1 MB).
- Topic 11.3, slides 9-10 (37', size: 8.5 MB).
- Topics 11.3-11.7, slides 11-39 (21', size: 4.9 MB).
- Topics 11.8-11.20, slides 40-99 (35', size: 7.9 MB).

Suggested readings
- There are many links inside the PowerPoint presentation (see above).

Required readings:
- lecture notes;
- from the textbook, The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy, read pp. 76-85;
- the first novella from Boccaccio's Decameron, the novella of Ciappelletto (link points to an external server, which may be slow at times).
- read Giorgio Vasari's Lives of the Artists: Leonardo Da Vinci (1550);
- read Chapter VII from Machiavelli's The Prince;
- read Chapter VIII from The Prince;
- read Chapter XVII from The Prince;
- read Chapter XXV from The Prince.

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Day 12 (Jan. 19)

Topics
Review session: during the first hour of this class, the instructor will answer any questions from the students on all topics and readings.
Final exam (maximum time allowed: two hours).

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


Syllabus

HUI216 -- Italian Civilization Through the Ages

Course Description
The historical development of civilization in Italy with reference to literature and connection to artistic expression such as visual arts, music, and theatre.

Course Prerequisites
Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B.

Course Objectives
This course offers an overview of Italian civilization and guides the students to a better understanding of its diverse manifestations, in various cultural fields and throughout the ages (from the Romans to the Renaissance). For the most part, contents are organized chronologically, bringing together different aspects of the Italian culture (the arts -- with the inclusion of painting, sculpture, architecture and music --, philosophy and science, literature and theater); as a crucial aid, background information about the history of Italy will also be introduced. In order to make this material manageable for the students, the course will focus on themes and ideas that are representative of each phase of Italian history and that are still part of the Italian heritage. The appreciation of that heritage and a better understanding of modern/contemporary Italian society and culture will be further goals of this course.

NB: this course satisfies category I of the D.E.C.

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Instructor: Dr. Andrea Fedi.
Office hours (rm. 1148, Humanities building): Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays 5:00-5:45, and by appointment. Telephone: (631) 632-7449 [there is no voice-mail; to leave an urgent message you can call Marie Sweatt, the secretary of the Department of European Languages, at (631) 632-7440].
E-mail: afedi@ms.cc.sunysb.edu

Textbook: Holmes, George, ed. The Oxford Illustrated History of Italy. Oxford University Press, 2001. [ISBN 0192854445]

Grades will be determined according to the following scale:

10% class participation and attendance
40% paper (due Jan. 22)
50% final exam (Jan. 19, 2:55-4:55, Humanities 1057)

These are the numeric equivalents of the letter grades:
- 94-100 = A
- 90-93 = A-
- 87-89 = B+
- 84-86 = B
- 80-83 = B-
- 77-79 = C+
- 74-76 = C
- 70-73 = C-
- 66-69 = D+
- 60-65 = D
- 0-59 = F

Attendance is essential. Since new material is introduced with each lecture, missing even just one class may have a serious effect on your grades. Attendance will be monitored using an attendance sheet.

Students are expected to
- arrive for class on time and leave the classroom only at the end of class;
- engage in class discussions and activities when appropriate;
- exhibit classroom behavior that is not disruptive of the learning environment;
- secure and turn off all electronic communications and entertainment devices during class time unless otherwise directed by the course instructor.

Participation is assessed on the basis of questions and comments made during class lectures, or submitted in writing (via e-mail) and in a timely fashion to the instructor.

The final exam consists of 40-45 multiple-choice questions and 6-9 essay questions. The final exam is cumulative.

Possible topics for the papers are listed in a separate section, at the end of this syllabus. Minimum length for the papers is 6 pages or 1,800 words; max. length is 10 pages or 3,000 words. The paper must be typed double-space and must be emailed to the instructor by the due date. Receipt of the paper will be acknowledged via email. Please do not forget to include your name and ID with your paper. If you quote from the textbook or any other source, please remember that you must use quotation marks and you must provide exact references for all your sources. All students are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic honesty. There will be no excuses accepted for plagiarism, cheating, or any other act which suggests that you have not fulfilled your academic responsibilities in this course; please refer to the Web site of the Academic Judiciary Committee for further details. All suspected incidents of academic dishonesty will be vigorously pursued.

If you have a physical, psychological, medical or learning disability that may impact your course work, please contact Disability Support Services (631) 632-6748/TDY or go to http://studentaffairs.stonybrook.edu/dss/. They will determine with you what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation is confidential. Students who require assistance during emergency evacuation are encouraged to discuss their needs with their professors and Disability Support Services. For procedures and information go to the following web site: http://www.stonybrook.edu/ehs/fire/disabilities/asp.

Topics: for a complete list of topics, readings and assignments, visit the section entitled Lectures, on this page.

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


Topics for the paper

For your paper, you can choose any of the following topics. If you wish to write on a different topic, you must consult me ahead of time, with an abstract or a detailed proposal, and obtain permission.

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[1] Local identities and cultures in contemporary Italian society. Their interactions with European and global frameworks. The impact on them of regulations and policies implemented by the European Union.

[2] Pre-Roman civilizations in Italy, with focus on the Greeks or the Etruscans. Cultural vestiges of the ancient world and surviving traditions. Modern characterizations of those civilizations and of their relevance for the creation of regional cultures in Tuscany and Southern Italy.

[3] The portrayal of Roman civilization in the novel Pompeii, by Robert Harris (2003). The juxtaposition of modern and classical elements.

[4] Tacitus and the idea of a decadent Roman empire.

[5] Hollywood and the representation of ancient Rome, in Ben-Hur, Spartacus, or Gladiator. References to Italy and the Italians.

[6] Italian Fascism and the exploitation of Roman history and culture in its propaganda. References to Roman civilization in fascist culture and the arts.

[7] Claudio Monteverdi's opera L'incoronazione di Poppea (1642). The portrayal of Nero and its court. Monteverdi's sources.

[8] The portrayal of St. Francis of Assisi in Liliani Cavani's movie Francesco (1989). Its treatment of the Franciscan sources.

[9] Matthew Pearl's novel, The Dante Club. References to Dante's Inferno, and to the reception of the Divine comedy in the US.

[10] Paolo and Francesca in Dante's Inferno 5. References to medieval culture, to the chivarlic genre and to the medieval philosophy of love. Modern reinterpretations of the story by artists and musicians.

[11] The popularity of Dante and the Divine comedy in modern times.

[12] Mercantile values and role-models for Italian society in Boccaccio's Decameron

[13] The Middle Ages in Italy, and how medieval culture and history influenced the construction of an Italian identity (national or regional).

[14] Chivalric literature in modern Italian culture, with reference to Calvino's Castle of crossed destinies, or to the Sicilian pupi (marionettes).

[15] Leonardo's image in modern culture, with reference to one or more of these books: Sigmund Freud, Leonardo and a memory of his childhood (1910); Michael Gelb, How to think like Leonardo da Vinci (1998); Dan Brown, The Da Vinci code (2003); Lewis Perdue, The Da Vinci legacy (1983, 2004).

[16] Machiavelli today, based on one or more of these books: Stanley Bing, What would Machiavelli do? The ends justify the meanness (2000); Michael Ledeen, Machiavelli on modern leadership. Why Machiavelli's iron rules are as timely and important today has five centuries ago (1999); Harriet Rubin, The Princessa. Machiavelli for women (1998); V., The Mafia manager: a guide to the corporate Machiavelli (1997).

[17] The representation of the Italian Renaissance (culture and society), in one or more of these novels: Sarah Dunant, The Birth of Venus (2003); Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason, The rule of four (2004).

[18] Classicism and neoclassicism in American culture, with reference to the arts (architecture, sculpture, painting) and/or to the political discourse of the Founding Fathers.

[19] The representation of Roman civilization and the fall of the Roman empire in Valerio Massimo Manfredi's historical novel, The Last Legion (2003).

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


General bibliography, organized by topics

This bibliography is organized by topics, for general reference, and also because many of the books listed in each section can be used for different papers.

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Tacitus

Fantham, Elaine. Roman literary culture: from Cicero to Apuleius. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Scarre, Christopher. Chronicle of the Roman emperors: the reign-by-reign record of the rulers of Imperial Rome. London; New York: Thames and Hudson, 1995.

Braund, David C. Augustus to Nero: a sourcebook on Roman history, 31 BC-AD 68. Totowa: Barnes and Noble, 1985.

Barrett, Anthony. Agrippina: sex, power, and politics in the early Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996.

Sinclair, Patrick. Tacitus the sententious historian: a sociology of rhetoric in Annales 1-6. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995.

Reflections of Nero: culture, history, and representation. Edited by Jačs Elsner and Jamie Masters. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1994.

Luce, T. James and A.J. Woodman, eds. Tacitus and the Tacitean tradition. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993.

Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis. The Representation of Reality in Western Literature. Trans. W.R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973.

Women and family in the classical world

Rawson, Beryl, ed. The Family in ancient Rome: new perspectives. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1986.

Bradley, K. R. Discovering the Roman family: studies in Roman social history. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Dixon, Suzanne. The Roman family. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992.

Hallett, Judith P. Fathers and daughters in Roman society: women and the elite family. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984.

Cantarella, Eva. Pandora's daughters: the role and status of women in Greek and Roman antiquity. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987.

Lekowitz, Mary R. Women's life in Greece and Rome. Compiled by Mary R. Lefkowitz and Maureen B. Fant. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982.

Dixon, Suzanne. The Roman mother. Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1987.

Fantham, Elaine et al. Women in the classical world: image and text. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Religion and state during antiquity

Wardman, Alan. Religion and statecraft among the Romans. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982.

MacMullen, Ramsay. Paganism in the Roman Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981.

Lee, A. D. Pagans and Christians in late antiquity: a sourcebook. London; New York: Routledge, 2000.

Segal, Alan F. Rebecca's children: Judaism and Christianity in the Roman world. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986.

Sordi, Marta. The Christians and the Roman Empire. Transl. by Annabel Bedini. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.

Lane Fox, Robin. Pagans and Christians. New York: Knopf, 1987.

Benko, Stephen. Pagan Rome and the early Christians. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984.

Helleman, Wendy E., ed. Christianity and the classics: the acceptance of a heritage. Lanham: University Press of America, 1990.

The influence of Roman civilization on Western culture and society

Richard, Carl J. The founders and the classics: Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1994.

Knox, Bernard. Backing into the future: the Classical tradition and its renewal. New York: W.W. Norton, 1994.

Acta Congressus Madvigiani: Hafniae MDMLIV (Proceedings of the Second International Congress of Classical Studies). Copenhagen: E. Munksgaard, 1957-1958.

Cantor, Norman. The Medieval Reader. HarperCollins, 1995.

Helleman, Wendy E., ed. Christianity and the classics: the acceptance of a heritage. Lanham: University Press of America, 1990.

Taylor, Henry O. The classical heritage of the Middle Ages. New York: F. Ungar, 1957.

Wyke, Maria. Projecting the past: ancient Rome, cinema, and history. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Roman civilization and Italian fascism

Bosworth, R.J.B. and Patrizia Dogli. Italian fascism: history, memory, and representation. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.

Berezin, Mabel. Making the fascist self: the political culture of interwar Italy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997.

Falasca-Zamponi, Simonetta. Fascist spectacle: the aesthetics of power in Mussolini's Italy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

Hay, James. Popular film culture in Fascist Italy: the passing of the Rex. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987.

The Italian Renaissance

Brand, Peter and Lino Pertile. The Cambridge history of Italian literature. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Conaway Bondanella, Julia and Mark Musa, eds. The Italian Renaissance reader. New York: New American Library, 1987.

Hay, Denys. The Italian Renaissance in its historical background. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1977.

Migiel, Marilyn and Juliana Schiesari, eds. Refiguring woman: perspectives on gender and the Italian Renaissance. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.

Toscano, Antonio, ed. Interpreting the Italian Renaissance: literary perspectives. New York: Forum Italicum, 1991.

General info | Calendar | Lectures and readings | Syllabus | Topics for the paper | Review sheets


Disclaimer: opinions, views or endorsements of any kind encountered on this page are not necessarily the policy of the University of Stony Brook.
The materials in this course available online or via a website link are for the exclusive use of registered students currently enrolled in this course, and may not be retained or further distributed. In addition to legal sanctions, violation of these copyright prohibitions may result in University disciplinary action.
This web site is owned and managed by Dr. Andrea Fedi, Dept. of European Languages, University of Stony Brook (NY). © 2006